Biana Bena
Asked 2 weeks ago

SG chevron_right Secondary 3 chevron_right Add Math: Algebra

How to do?

Replies 2

MAPLES

18

2 weeks ago
MAPLES

Please introduce iMath to your classmates

1 week ago

pupun
Asked 2 weeks ago

SG chevron_right Secondary 3 chevron_right Geometry and Measurement

What is septagon

Replies 2

MAPLES

Septagon is another name of Heptagon

2 weeks ago
MAPLES

Heptagon

2 weeks ago

Daisy
Asked 2 weeks ago

SG chevron_right Secondary 1 chevron_right Number and Algebra

I neeeeeees a tutor today! At 3:30! Can anyone help?

Replies 1

Yueh Mei Liu

Click on My Tutor and book the tutor who is listed.

2 weeks ago

Rabyyy
Asked 2 weeks ago

SG chevron_right Primary 1 chevron_right Number and Algebra

How?

Replies 1

MAPLES

87.5 cm^2

2 weeks ago

Steven
Asked 2 weeks ago

SG chevron_right Secondary 3 chevron_right Number and Algebra

Pls help this. Thank you

Replies 2

IndirectLearning™️

Alu baba chaka men

1 week ago
IndirectLearning™️

Let me help you Steven, but indirectly so that you can understand. An integer (pronounced IN-tuh-jer) is a whole number (not a fractional number) that can be positive, negative, or zero. Examples of integers are: -5, 1, 5, 8, 97, and 3,043. Examples of numbers that are not integers are: -1.43, 1 3/4, 3.14, .09, and 5,643.1. The set of integers, denoted Z, is formally defined as follows: Z = {..., -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...} In mathematical equations, unknown or unspecified integers are represented by lowercase, italicized letters from the "late middle" of the alphabet. The most common are p, q, r, and s. The set Z is a denumerable set. Denumerability refers to the fact that, even though there might be an infinite number of elements in a set, those elements can be denoted by a list that implies the identity of every element in the set. For example, it is intuitive from the list {..., -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...} that 356,804,251 and -67,332 are integers, but 356,804,251.5, -67,332.89, -4/3, and 0.232323 ... are not. The elements of Z can be paired off one-to-one with the elements of N, the set of natural numbers, with no elements being left out of either set. Let N = {1, 2, 3, ...}. Then the pairing can proceed in this way: In infinite sets, the existence of a one-to-one correspondence is the litmus test for determining cardinality, or size. The set of natural numbers and the set of rational numbers have the same cardinality as Z. However, the sets of real numbers, imaginary numbers, and complex numbers have cardinality larger than that of Z.

1 week ago